@1 month ago with 8639 notes
#NASA #space 

thescienceofreality:

NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft Obtains Best Views of Saturn Hexagon via NASA 

Image Credits [Top to bottom, left to right]: First & second images, NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI/Hampton. Third & fourth images, NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has obtained the highest-resolution movie yet of a unique six-sided jet stream, known as the hexagon, around Saturn’s north pole.

This is the first hexagon movie of its kind, using color filters, and the first to show a complete view of the top of Saturn down to about 70 degrees latitude. Spanning about 20,000 miles (30,000 kilometers) across, the hexagon is a wavy jet stream of 200-mile-per-hour winds (about 322 kilometers per hour) with a massive, rotating storm at the center. There is no weather feature exactly, consistently like this anywhere else in the solar system.

"The hexagon is just a current of air, and weather features out there that share similarities to this are notoriously turbulent and unstable," said Andrew Ingersoll, a Cassini imaging team member at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "A hurricane on Earth typically lasts a week, but this has been here for decades — and who knows — maybe centuries."

Weather patterns on Earth are interrupted when they encounter friction from landforms or ice caps. Scientists suspect the stability of the hexagon has something to do with the lack of solid landforms on Saturn, which is essentially a giant ball of gas.

Better views of the hexagon are available now because the sun began to illuminate its interior in late 2012. Cassini captured images of the hexagon over a 10-hour time span with high-resolution cameras, giving scientists a good look at the motion of cloud structures within.

They saw the storm around the pole, as well as small vortices rotating in the opposite direction of the hexagon. Some of the vortices are swept along with the jet stream as if on a racetrack. The largest of these vortices spans about 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers), or about twice the size of the largest hurricane recorded on Earth.

Scientists analyzed these images in false color, a rendering method that makes it easier to distinguish differences among the types of particles suspended in the atmosphere — relatively small particles that make up haze — inside and outside the hexagon.

Continue reading …

(via galaxyclusters)

@9 months ago with 390 notes
#Saturn #cassini #nasa 
gunsandposes:

Vintage 1980s computer simulation of Pioneer 11 encountering Saturn, from Jim Blinn and the team at JPL/CalTech/NASA.

gunsandposes:

Vintage 1980s computer simulation of Pioneer 11 encountering Saturn, from Jim Blinn and the team at JPL/CalTech/NASA.

(Source: youtube.com, via galaxyclusters)

@11 months ago with 44259 notes
#pioneer 11 #saturn #gif #astronomy #nasa #caltech 

jtotheizzoe:

This morning’s Antares/Cygnus launch. More about this historic mission here.

@1 year ago with 1007 notes
#space #gif #nasa #launch #shuttles #antares #cygnus 

staceythinx:

These vintage NASA space suit test photos from the San Diego Air and Science Museum Archive on Flickr look like they could have been shot on the set of a music video.

@1 year ago with 3142 notes
#science #nasa #astronauts #humans #history #astronomy 

digg:

Chris Hadfield wrings out a washcloth in space, proving once again that every single thing you do is 100x cooler in space.

(via likeaphysicist)

@1 year ago with 22216 notes
#astronauts #space #water #science #nasa #iss 
@1 year ago with 805 notes
#gif #space #iss #nasa #milky way 

NASA’s Swift Sizes Up Comet ISON

Astronomers from the University of Maryland at College Park (UMCP) and Lowell Observatory have used NASA’s Swift satellite to check out comet C/2012 S1 (ISON), which may become one of the most dazzling in decades when it rounds the sun later this year.

Read More.

(Source: nasa.gov, via sagansense)

@1 year ago with 25 notes
#video #astronomy #comet #nasa #astrophysics 

"For the first time in all of time, men have seen the Earth. Seen it not as continents or oceans from the little distance of a hundred miles or two or three, but seen it from the depths of space; seen it whole and round and beautiful and small… To see the Earth as it truly is, small and blue and beautiful in that eternal silence where it floats, is to see ourselves as riders on the Earth together, brothers on that bright loveliness in the eternal cold—brothers who know that they are truly brothers."

@9 months ago with 358 notes
#earthrise #earth #quote #nasa #humans 

NGC 891 edge-on

This sharp cosmic portrait features NGC 891. The spiral galaxy spans about 100 thousand light-years and is seen almost exactly edge-on from our perspective. In fact, about 30 million light-years distant in the constellation Andromeda, NGC 891 looks a lot like our Milky Way. At first glance, it has a flat, thin, galactic disk and a central bulge cut along the middle by regions of dark obscuring dust. The combined image data also reveal the galaxy’s young blue star clusters and telltale pinkish star forming regions. And remarkably apparent in NGC 891’s edge-on presentation are filaments of dust that extend hundreds of light-years above and below the centre line. The dust has likely been blown out of the disk by supernova explosions or intense star formation activity. Faint neighboring galaxies can also be seen near this galaxy’s disk.

Image credit & copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona

NGC 891 edge-on

This sharp cosmic portrait features NGC 891. The spiral galaxy spans about 100 thousand light-years and is seen almost exactly edge-on from our perspective. In fact, about 30 million light-years distant in the constellation Andromeda, NGC 891 looks a lot like our Milky Way. At first glance, it has a flat, thin, galactic disk and a central bulge cut along the middle by regions of dark obscuring dust. The combined image data also reveal the galaxy’s young blue star clusters and telltale pinkish star forming regions. And remarkably apparent in NGC 891’s edge-on presentation are filaments of dust that extend hundreds of light-years above and below the centre line. The dust has likely been blown out of the disk by supernova explosions or intense star formation activity. Faint neighboring galaxies can also be seen near this galaxy’s disk.

Image credit & copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona

(Source: star.ucl.ac.uk, via likeaphysicist)

@11 months ago with 219 notes
#astronomy #galaxies #nasa #ngc 891 #spiral galaxy 
pappubahry:

Earth, photographed by Apollo 4, 8 November 1967.  On this unmanned mission, they pointed a camera out the window and had it take photos at regular intervals during the couple of hours in which the Earth was visible.  In the full frames, Earth moves across the window from left to right; I’ve cropped them so that it doesn’t move sideways, and as a result, what looks like a smudge on the window is visible in the gif moving from left to right.  (Mission-roll-frame AS04-1-500ff.)

pappubahry:

Earth, photographed by Apollo 4, 8 November 1967.  On this unmanned mission, they pointed a camera out the window and had it take photos at regular intervals during the couple of hours in which the Earth was visible.  In the full frames, Earth moves across the window from left to right; I’ve cropped them so that it doesn’t move sideways, and as a result, what looks like a smudge on the window is visible in the gif moving from left to right.  (Mission-roll-frame AS04-1-500ff.)

(via n-a-s-a)

@11 months ago with 1879 notes
#science #earth #apollo 4 #apollo #nasa #gif #astronomy 

(Source: missfrenchy, via likeaphysicist)

@1 year ago with 1209 notes
#science #nasa 

Galaxy Collisions: Simulation vs Observations

The folks over at NASA apod just put up an awesome galaxy collisions, simulations and observations video for the public. I made a little gif set to go along with the video which can be found here.

What happens when two galaxies collide? Although it may take over a billion years, such titanic clashes are quite common.

Images Credit: NASA, ESA; Visualization: Frank Summers (STScI);

Simulation: Chris Mihos (CWRU) & Lars Hernquist (Harvard).

Since galaxies are mostly empty space, no internal stars are likely to themselves collide. Rather the gravitation of each galaxy will distort or destroy the other galaxy, and the galaxies may eventually merge to form a single larger galaxy.

Expansive das and dust clouds collide and trigger waves of star formation that complete even during the interaction process. Pictured above is a computer simulation of two large spiral galaxies colliding, interspersed with real still images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Our own Milky Way Galaxy has absorbed several smaller galaxies during its existence and is even projected to merge with the larger neighboring Andromeda galaxy in a few billion years.

(Source: afro-dominicano)

@1 year ago with 1665 notes
#nasa #galaxies #science #milky way #gif #astronomy #esa 
pappubahry:

Eruption of the Tvashtar volcano on Jupiter’s moon Io, photographed by New Horizons, 1 March 2007, during its gravity-assist Jupiter flyby on its way to Pluto.  I’ve brightened the pictures so that some detail on the darker part of Io is clearer.
The gif covers about 8 minutes of real time.  If you count pixels and look up Io’s diameter, it looks like the plume’s “only” being thrown up to an altitude of 200km or so.  But in fact the volcano is in the opposite hemisphere to the one we see here (albeit at a high latitude of about 67 degrees), and the plumes are reaching a height of over 300km.
There is much more detail about this volcano at the Gish Bar Times blog.

pappubahry:

Eruption of the Tvashtar volcano on Jupiter’s moon Io, photographed by New Horizons, 1 March 2007, during its gravity-assist Jupiter flyby on its way to Pluto.  I’ve brightened the pictures so that some detail on the darker part of Io is clearer.

The gif covers about 8 minutes of real time.  If you count pixels and look up Io’s diameter, it looks like the plume’s “only” being thrown up to an altitude of 200km or so.  But in fact the volcano is in the opposite hemisphere to the one we see here (albeit at a high latitude of about 67 degrees), and the plumes are reaching a height of over 300km.

There is much more detail about this volcano at the Gish Bar Times blog.

(via loveyourchaos)

@1 year ago with 1972 notes
#astronomy #jupiter #io #gif #solar system #nasa #new horizons 

Saturn V launch - 1968

Saturn V launch - 1968

(Source: lasersalsa, via galaxyclusters)

@1 year ago with 566 notes
#saturn V #nasa #astronauts #art #humans 
1 month ago
#NASA #space 
"For the first time in all of time, men have seen the Earth. Seen it not as continents or oceans from the little distance of a hundred miles or two or three, but seen it from the depths of space; seen it whole and round and beautiful and small… To see the Earth as it truly is, small and blue and beautiful in that eternal silence where it floats, is to see ourselves as riders on the Earth together, brothers on that bright loveliness in the eternal cold—brothers who know that they are truly brothers."
9 months ago
#earthrise #earth #quote #nasa #humans 
9 months ago
#Saturn #cassini #nasa 

NGC 891 edge-on

This sharp cosmic portrait features NGC 891. The spiral galaxy spans about 100 thousand light-years and is seen almost exactly edge-on from our perspective. In fact, about 30 million light-years distant in the constellation Andromeda, NGC 891 looks a lot like our Milky Way. At first glance, it has a flat, thin, galactic disk and a central bulge cut along the middle by regions of dark obscuring dust. The combined image data also reveal the galaxy’s young blue star clusters and telltale pinkish star forming regions. And remarkably apparent in NGC 891’s edge-on presentation are filaments of dust that extend hundreds of light-years above and below the centre line. The dust has likely been blown out of the disk by supernova explosions or intense star formation activity. Faint neighboring galaxies can also be seen near this galaxy’s disk.

Image credit & copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona
11 months ago
#astronomy #galaxies #nasa #ngc 891 #spiral galaxy 
gunsandposes:

Vintage 1980s computer simulation of Pioneer 11 encountering Saturn, from Jim Blinn and the team at JPL/CalTech/NASA.
11 months ago
#pioneer 11 #saturn #gif #astronomy #nasa #caltech 
pappubahry:

Earth, photographed by Apollo 4, 8 November 1967.  On this unmanned mission, they pointed a camera out the window and had it take photos at regular intervals during the couple of hours in which the Earth was visible.  In the full frames, Earth moves across the window from left to right; I’ve cropped them so that it doesn’t move sideways, and as a result, what looks like a smudge on the window is visible in the gif moving from left to right.  (Mission-roll-frame AS04-1-500ff.)
11 months ago
#science #earth #apollo 4 #apollo #nasa #gif #astronomy 
1 year ago
#space #gif #nasa #launch #shuttles #antares #cygnus 
1 year ago
#science #nasa 
1 year ago
#science #nasa #astronauts #humans #history #astronomy 
1 year ago
#nasa #galaxies #science #milky way #gif #astronomy #esa 
1 year ago
#astronauts #space #water #science #nasa #iss 
pappubahry:

Eruption of the Tvashtar volcano on Jupiter’s moon Io, photographed by New Horizons, 1 March 2007, during its gravity-assist Jupiter flyby on its way to Pluto.  I’ve brightened the pictures so that some detail on the darker part of Io is clearer.
The gif covers about 8 minutes of real time.  If you count pixels and look up Io’s diameter, it looks like the plume’s “only” being thrown up to an altitude of 200km or so.  But in fact the volcano is in the opposite hemisphere to the one we see here (albeit at a high latitude of about 67 degrees), and the plumes are reaching a height of over 300km.
There is much more detail about this volcano at the Gish Bar Times blog.
1 year ago
#astronomy #jupiter #io #gif #solar system #nasa #new horizons 
1 year ago
#gif #space #iss #nasa #milky way 

Saturn V launch - 1968
1 year ago
#saturn V #nasa #astronauts #art #humans 
1 year ago
#video #astronomy #comet #nasa #astrophysics