zerostatereflex:

Swarm of Tiny Spacecraft to Explore Europa’s Surface with Rapid Response

"A small spacecraft carrying a swarm of "chipsats" the size of postage stamps could someday explore Jupiter’s icy moon, Europa. NASA has funded early development of the unusual mission idea as it looks toward future space exploration of planets and moons that may contain both water and extraterrestrial life."

Imagine seeding the galaxy with something like this? Give us 100 years and the sophistication of such a tiny device could actually delivery life to other galaxies. 

Perhaps that’s what another civilization did, and that’s why we’re here. 

(GIF From: KickSat Sprite deployment / Sprite Spacecraft)

(via galaxyclusters)

@1 week ago with 576 notes
#that's amazing #europa #nasa #space #humans #astronomy #jupiter 
utcjonesobservatory:

Galaxy Of Deception
Astronomers have studied galactic evolution for decades, gradually improving our knowledge of how galaxies have changed over cosmic history. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has played a big part in this, allowing astronomers to see further into the distance, and hence further back in time, than any telescope before it — capturing light that has taken billions of years to reach us.
 Looking further into the very distant past to observe younger and younger galaxies is very valuable, but it is not without its problems for astronomers. All newly-born galaxies lie very far away from us and appear very small and faint in the images. On the contrary, all the galaxies near to us appear to be old ones.
 DDO 68, captured here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, was one of the best candidates so far discovered for a newly-formed galaxy in our cosmic neighbourhood. The galaxy lies around 39 million light-years away from us; although this distance may seem huge, it is in fact roughly 50 times closer than the usual distances to such galaxies, which are on the order of several billions of light years.
 By studying galaxies of various ages, astronomers have found that those early in their lives are fundamentally different from those that are older. DDO 68 looks to be relatively youthful based on its structure, appearance, and composition. However, without more detailed modelling astronomers cannot be sure and they think it may be older than it lets on.
 Elderly galaxies tend to be larger thanks to collisions and mergers with other galaxies that have bulked them out, and are populated with a variety of different types of stars — including old, young, large, and small ones. Their chemical makeup is different too. Newly-formed galaxies have a similar composition to the primordial matter created in the Big Bang (hydrogen, helium and a little lithium), while older galaxies are enriched with heavier elements forged in stellar furnaces over multiple generations of stars.
 DDO 68 is the best representation yet of a primordial galaxy in the local Universe as it appears at first glance to be very low in heavier elements — whose presence would be a sign of the existence of previous generations of stars.
 Hubble observations were carried out in order to study the properties of the galaxy’s light, and to confirm whether or not there are any older stars in DDO 68. If there are, which there seem to be, this would disprove the hypothesis that it is entirely made up of young stars. If not, it would confirm the unique nature of this galaxy. More complex modelling is needed before we can know for sure but Hubble’s picture certainly gives us a beautiful view of this unusual object.
 The image is made up of exposures in visible and infrared light taken with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.
 Caption: NASA/ESA  NASA/ESA

utcjonesobservatory:

Galaxy Of Deception

Astronomers have studied galactic evolution for decades, gradually improving our knowledge of how galaxies have changed over cosmic history. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has played a big part in this, allowing astronomers to see further into the distance, and hence further back in time, than any telescope before it — capturing light that has taken billions of years to reach us.

 Looking further into the very distant past to observe younger and younger galaxies is very valuable, but it is not without its problems for astronomers. All newly-born galaxies lie very far away from us and appear very small and faint in the images. On the contrary, all the galaxies near to us appear to be old ones.

 DDO 68, captured here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, was one of the best candidates so far discovered for a newly-formed galaxy in our cosmic neighbourhood. The galaxy lies around 39 million light-years away from us; although this distance may seem huge, it is in fact roughly 50 times closer than the usual distances to such galaxies, which are on the order of several billions of light years.

 By studying galaxies of various ages, astronomers have found that those early in their lives are fundamentally different from those that are older. DDO 68 looks to be relatively youthful based on its structure, appearance, and composition. However, without more detailed modelling astronomers cannot be sure and they think it may be older than it lets on.

 Elderly galaxies tend to be larger thanks to collisions and mergers with other galaxies that have bulked them out, and are populated with a variety of different types of stars — including old, young, large, and small ones. Their chemical makeup is different too. Newly-formed galaxies have a similar composition to the primordial matter created in the Big Bang (hydrogen, helium and a little lithium), while older galaxies are enriched with heavier elements forged in stellar furnaces over multiple generations of stars.

 DDO 68 is the best representation yet of a primordial galaxy in the local Universe as it appears at first glance to be very low in heavier elements — whose presence would be a sign of the existence of previous generations of stars.

 Hubble observations were carried out in order to study the properties of the galaxy’s light, and to confirm whether or not there are any older stars in DDO 68. If there are, which there seem to be, this would disprove the hypothesis that it is entirely made up of young stars. If not, it would confirm the unique nature of this galaxy. More complex modelling is needed before we can know for sure but Hubble’s picture certainly gives us a beautiful view of this unusual object.

 The image is made up of exposures in visible and infrared light taken with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.

 Caption: NASA/ESA
  NASA/ESA

(via galaxyclusters)

@2 weeks ago with 133 notes
#astronomy #galaxies #astrophysics #nasa #esa 
@2 months ago with 8718 notes
#NASA #space 

thescienceofreality:

NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft Obtains Best Views of Saturn Hexagon via NASA 

Image Credits [Top to bottom, left to right]: First & second images, NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI/Hampton. Third & fourth images, NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has obtained the highest-resolution movie yet of a unique six-sided jet stream, known as the hexagon, around Saturn’s north pole.

This is the first hexagon movie of its kind, using color filters, and the first to show a complete view of the top of Saturn down to about 70 degrees latitude. Spanning about 20,000 miles (30,000 kilometers) across, the hexagon is a wavy jet stream of 200-mile-per-hour winds (about 322 kilometers per hour) with a massive, rotating storm at the center. There is no weather feature exactly, consistently like this anywhere else in the solar system.

"The hexagon is just a current of air, and weather features out there that share similarities to this are notoriously turbulent and unstable," said Andrew Ingersoll, a Cassini imaging team member at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "A hurricane on Earth typically lasts a week, but this has been here for decades — and who knows — maybe centuries."

Weather patterns on Earth are interrupted when they encounter friction from landforms or ice caps. Scientists suspect the stability of the hexagon has something to do with the lack of solid landforms on Saturn, which is essentially a giant ball of gas.

Better views of the hexagon are available now because the sun began to illuminate its interior in late 2012. Cassini captured images of the hexagon over a 10-hour time span with high-resolution cameras, giving scientists a good look at the motion of cloud structures within.

They saw the storm around the pole, as well as small vortices rotating in the opposite direction of the hexagon. Some of the vortices are swept along with the jet stream as if on a racetrack. The largest of these vortices spans about 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers), or about twice the size of the largest hurricane recorded on Earth.

Scientists analyzed these images in false color, a rendering method that makes it easier to distinguish differences among the types of particles suspended in the atmosphere — relatively small particles that make up haze — inside and outside the hexagon.

Continue reading …

(via galaxyclusters)

@10 months ago with 392 notes
#Saturn #cassini #nasa 
gunsandposes:

Vintage 1980s computer simulation of Pioneer 11 encountering Saturn, from Jim Blinn and the team at JPL/CalTech/NASA.

gunsandposes:

Vintage 1980s computer simulation of Pioneer 11 encountering Saturn, from Jim Blinn and the team at JPL/CalTech/NASA.

(Source: youtube.com, via galaxyclusters)

@1 year ago with 44784 notes
#pioneer 11 #saturn #gif #astronomy #nasa #caltech 

jtotheizzoe:

This morning’s Antares/Cygnus launch. More about this historic mission here.

@1 year ago with 1008 notes
#space #gif #nasa #launch #shuttles #antares #cygnus 

staceythinx:

These vintage NASA space suit test photos from the San Diego Air and Science Museum Archive on Flickr look like they could have been shot on the set of a music video.

@1 year ago with 3141 notes
#science #nasa #astronauts #humans #history #astronomy 

digg:

Chris Hadfield wrings out a washcloth in space, proving once again that every single thing you do is 100x cooler in space.

(via likeaphysicist)

@1 year ago with 22214 notes
#astronauts #space #water #science #nasa #iss 
generalelectric:

Throwback to the time Voyager 1 reached interstellar space and became the farthest human-made object from Earth. What NASA engineers expected to last for five years has lasted for over 37. And it still continues today, barreling through uncharted territories and carrying a piece of all of us to whatever it may encounter. Happy World Space Week! 

generalelectric:

Throwback to the time Voyager 1 reached interstellar space and became the farthest human-made object from Earth. What NASA engineers expected to last for five years has lasted for over 37. And it still continues today, barreling through uncharted territories and carrying a piece of all of us to whatever it may encounter. Happy World Space Week! 

(Source: txchnologist, via galaxyclusters)

@1 week ago with 760 notes
#voyager #nasa #astrophysics #astronomy 

spaceplasma:

No matter when or where you look, the Sun is always doing something interesting.

  • Image credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO

(via galaxyclusters)

@2 weeks ago with 1563 notes
#sun #gif #nasa 

"For the first time in all of time, men have seen the Earth. Seen it not as continents or oceans from the little distance of a hundred miles or two or three, but seen it from the depths of space; seen it whole and round and beautiful and small… To see the Earth as it truly is, small and blue and beautiful in that eternal silence where it floats, is to see ourselves as riders on the Earth together, brothers on that bright loveliness in the eternal cold—brothers who know that they are truly brothers."

@9 months ago with 358 notes
#earthrise #earth #quote #nasa #humans 

NGC 891 edge-on

This sharp cosmic portrait features NGC 891. The spiral galaxy spans about 100 thousand light-years and is seen almost exactly edge-on from our perspective. In fact, about 30 million light-years distant in the constellation Andromeda, NGC 891 looks a lot like our Milky Way. At first glance, it has a flat, thin, galactic disk and a central bulge cut along the middle by regions of dark obscuring dust. The combined image data also reveal the galaxy’s young blue star clusters and telltale pinkish star forming regions. And remarkably apparent in NGC 891’s edge-on presentation are filaments of dust that extend hundreds of light-years above and below the centre line. The dust has likely been blown out of the disk by supernova explosions or intense star formation activity. Faint neighboring galaxies can also be seen near this galaxy’s disk.

Image credit & copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona

NGC 891 edge-on

This sharp cosmic portrait features NGC 891. The spiral galaxy spans about 100 thousand light-years and is seen almost exactly edge-on from our perspective. In fact, about 30 million light-years distant in the constellation Andromeda, NGC 891 looks a lot like our Milky Way. At first glance, it has a flat, thin, galactic disk and a central bulge cut along the middle by regions of dark obscuring dust. The combined image data also reveal the galaxy’s young blue star clusters and telltale pinkish star forming regions. And remarkably apparent in NGC 891’s edge-on presentation are filaments of dust that extend hundreds of light-years above and below the centre line. The dust has likely been blown out of the disk by supernova explosions or intense star formation activity. Faint neighboring galaxies can also be seen near this galaxy’s disk.

Image credit & copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona

(Source: star.ucl.ac.uk, via likeaphysicist)

@1 year ago with 219 notes
#astronomy #galaxies #nasa #ngc 891 #spiral galaxy 
pappubahry:

Earth, photographed by Apollo 4, 8 November 1967.  On this unmanned mission, they pointed a camera out the window and had it take photos at regular intervals during the couple of hours in which the Earth was visible.  In the full frames, Earth moves across the window from left to right; I’ve cropped them so that it doesn’t move sideways, and as a result, what looks like a smudge on the window is visible in the gif moving from left to right.  (Mission-roll-frame AS04-1-500ff.)

pappubahry:

Earth, photographed by Apollo 4, 8 November 1967.  On this unmanned mission, they pointed a camera out the window and had it take photos at regular intervals during the couple of hours in which the Earth was visible.  In the full frames, Earth moves across the window from left to right; I’ve cropped them so that it doesn’t move sideways, and as a result, what looks like a smudge on the window is visible in the gif moving from left to right.  (Mission-roll-frame AS04-1-500ff.)

(via n-a-s-a)

@1 year ago with 1880 notes
#science #earth #apollo 4 #apollo #nasa #gif #astronomy 

(Source: missfrenchy, via likeaphysicist)

@1 year ago with 1209 notes
#science #nasa 

Galaxy Collisions: Simulation vs Observations

The folks over at NASA apod just put up an awesome galaxy collisions, simulations and observations video for the public. I made a little gif set to go along with the video which can be found here.

What happens when two galaxies collide? Although it may take over a billion years, such titanic clashes are quite common.

Images Credit: NASA, ESA; Visualization: Frank Summers (STScI);

Simulation: Chris Mihos (CWRU) & Lars Hernquist (Harvard).

Since galaxies are mostly empty space, no internal stars are likely to themselves collide. Rather the gravitation of each galaxy will distort or destroy the other galaxy, and the galaxies may eventually merge to form a single larger galaxy.

Expansive das and dust clouds collide and trigger waves of star formation that complete even during the interaction process. Pictured above is a computer simulation of two large spiral galaxies colliding, interspersed with real still images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Our own Milky Way Galaxy has absorbed several smaller galaxies during its existence and is even projected to merge with the larger neighboring Andromeda galaxy in a few billion years.

(Source: afro-dominicano)

@1 year ago with 1664 notes
#nasa #galaxies #science #milky way #gif #astronomy #esa 
1 week ago
#that's amazing #europa #nasa #space #humans #astronomy #jupiter 
generalelectric:

Throwback to the time Voyager 1 reached interstellar space and became the farthest human-made object from Earth. What NASA engineers expected to last for five years has lasted for over 37. And it still continues today, barreling through uncharted territories and carrying a piece of all of us to whatever it may encounter. Happy World Space Week! 
1 week ago
#voyager #nasa #astrophysics #astronomy 
utcjonesobservatory:

Galaxy Of Deception
Astronomers have studied galactic evolution for decades, gradually improving our knowledge of how galaxies have changed over cosmic history. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has played a big part in this, allowing astronomers to see further into the distance, and hence further back in time, than any telescope before it — capturing light that has taken billions of years to reach us.
 Looking further into the very distant past to observe younger and younger galaxies is very valuable, but it is not without its problems for astronomers. All newly-born galaxies lie very far away from us and appear very small and faint in the images. On the contrary, all the galaxies near to us appear to be old ones.
 DDO 68, captured here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, was one of the best candidates so far discovered for a newly-formed galaxy in our cosmic neighbourhood. The galaxy lies around 39 million light-years away from us; although this distance may seem huge, it is in fact roughly 50 times closer than the usual distances to such galaxies, which are on the order of several billions of light years.
 By studying galaxies of various ages, astronomers have found that those early in their lives are fundamentally different from those that are older. DDO 68 looks to be relatively youthful based on its structure, appearance, and composition. However, without more detailed modelling astronomers cannot be sure and they think it may be older than it lets on.
 Elderly galaxies tend to be larger thanks to collisions and mergers with other galaxies that have bulked them out, and are populated with a variety of different types of stars — including old, young, large, and small ones. Their chemical makeup is different too. Newly-formed galaxies have a similar composition to the primordial matter created in the Big Bang (hydrogen, helium and a little lithium), while older galaxies are enriched with heavier elements forged in stellar furnaces over multiple generations of stars.
 DDO 68 is the best representation yet of a primordial galaxy in the local Universe as it appears at first glance to be very low in heavier elements — whose presence would be a sign of the existence of previous generations of stars.
 Hubble observations were carried out in order to study the properties of the galaxy’s light, and to confirm whether or not there are any older stars in DDO 68. If there are, which there seem to be, this would disprove the hypothesis that it is entirely made up of young stars. If not, it would confirm the unique nature of this galaxy. More complex modelling is needed before we can know for sure but Hubble’s picture certainly gives us a beautiful view of this unusual object.
 The image is made up of exposures in visible and infrared light taken with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.
 Caption: NASA/ESA  NASA/ESA
2 weeks ago
#astronomy #galaxies #astrophysics #nasa #esa 
2 weeks ago
#sun #gif #nasa 
2 months ago
#NASA #space 
"For the first time in all of time, men have seen the Earth. Seen it not as continents or oceans from the little distance of a hundred miles or two or three, but seen it from the depths of space; seen it whole and round and beautiful and small… To see the Earth as it truly is, small and blue and beautiful in that eternal silence where it floats, is to see ourselves as riders on the Earth together, brothers on that bright loveliness in the eternal cold—brothers who know that they are truly brothers."
9 months ago
#earthrise #earth #quote #nasa #humans 
10 months ago
#Saturn #cassini #nasa 

NGC 891 edge-on

This sharp cosmic portrait features NGC 891. The spiral galaxy spans about 100 thousand light-years and is seen almost exactly edge-on from our perspective. In fact, about 30 million light-years distant in the constellation Andromeda, NGC 891 looks a lot like our Milky Way. At first glance, it has a flat, thin, galactic disk and a central bulge cut along the middle by regions of dark obscuring dust. The combined image data also reveal the galaxy’s young blue star clusters and telltale pinkish star forming regions. And remarkably apparent in NGC 891’s edge-on presentation are filaments of dust that extend hundreds of light-years above and below the centre line. The dust has likely been blown out of the disk by supernova explosions or intense star formation activity. Faint neighboring galaxies can also be seen near this galaxy’s disk.

Image credit & copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona
1 year ago
#astronomy #galaxies #nasa #ngc 891 #spiral galaxy 
gunsandposes:

Vintage 1980s computer simulation of Pioneer 11 encountering Saturn, from Jim Blinn and the team at JPL/CalTech/NASA.
1 year ago
#pioneer 11 #saturn #gif #astronomy #nasa #caltech 
pappubahry:

Earth, photographed by Apollo 4, 8 November 1967.  On this unmanned mission, they pointed a camera out the window and had it take photos at regular intervals during the couple of hours in which the Earth was visible.  In the full frames, Earth moves across the window from left to right; I’ve cropped them so that it doesn’t move sideways, and as a result, what looks like a smudge on the window is visible in the gif moving from left to right.  (Mission-roll-frame AS04-1-500ff.)
1 year ago
#science #earth #apollo 4 #apollo #nasa #gif #astronomy 
1 year ago
#space #gif #nasa #launch #shuttles #antares #cygnus 
1 year ago
#science #nasa 
1 year ago
#science #nasa #astronauts #humans #history #astronomy 
1 year ago
#nasa #galaxies #science #milky way #gif #astronomy #esa 
1 year ago
#astronauts #space #water #science #nasa #iss