At the fractures of the first second after the big bang.
Fariedesign | Society6 | Facebook 

Source: fariedesign

At the fractures of the first second after the big bang.

Fariedesign | Society6 | Facebook

Source: fariedesign

(via sagansense)

@3 months ago with 3039 notes
#big bang #art #illustration #science #astrophysics #astronomy 
did-you-kno:

Source
@3 months ago with 5755 notes
#fact #north star #astronomy 

(Source: itslatingirl, via loveyourchaos)

@3 months ago with 82560 notes
#moon #moon phases #astronomy 
sagansense:

Mars’ potato-shaped moon Phobos will be receiving a fly-by of ESA’s Mars Express spacecraft this Sunday! Zipping by 28 feet above its surface, the spacecraft will be traveling too close and too fast for any photo ops, but the science collected from this fly-by will provide the most accurate details yet of the 27 x 22 x 18km moon’s gravitational field, which in turn, will enable us to better understand its internal structure.

"At just 45 km from the surface, our spacecraft is passing almost within touching distance of Phobos…we’ve been carrying out maneuvers every few months to put the spacecraft on track and, together with the ground stations that will be monitoring it on its close approach, we are ready to make some extremely accurate measurements at Phobos." stated Michael Denis, the Mars Express Operations Manager [source]

As the spacecraft nears Phobos, it will be pulled off course by the moon’s gravity, altering its velocity by a mere few centimeters per second. As these measurements are sent back as radio signals from Mars Express, Earthly scientists will then translate them to determine the mass and and density structure within the moon. This data will assist in addressing questions of origin pertaining to Phobos’ planetary sibling, Deimos, as well.

How does this work? Mars Express possesses a high-resolution stereo camera which has been taking photos of Phobos against the background star field in the previous weeks leading up to this 35 hour tracking sequence: before, during and after the close encounter with Phobos. In addition to researching obtained toward its gravitational field, Mars Express will take measurements on the influence of solar wind on the moon’s surface.

"By making close flybys of Phobos with Mars Express in this way, we can help to put constraints on the origin of these mysterious moons…Mars Express entered orbit around the Red Planet exactly ten years ago this week – this close flyby of Phobos is certainly an exciting way to celebrate!"
- Olivier Witasse, Mars Express Project Scientist at ESA [source]

Phobos’ relative size compared to the Alpes and town of Grenoble, France. 

Not so lumpy now, eh?



Excerpts and information from the Phys.org article 'Mars Express heading towards daring flyby of Phobos'. For further details on this marvelous spacecraft, ESA put together a 10-year video montage of Mars Express highlights, providing insight into the sophisticated equipment on board, which you can accompany with the 90-minute replay of ESA’s Mars Express conference from June 2013, which highlights the key scientific discoveries of the mission along with a new mineral atlas created to chart the geological history of Mars.

sagansense:

Mars’ potato-shaped moon Phobos will be receiving a fly-by of ESA’s Mars Express spacecraft this Sunday! Zipping by 28 feet above its surface, the spacecraft will be traveling too close and too fast for any photo ops, but the science collected from this fly-by will provide the most accurate details yet of the 27 x 22 x 18km moon’s gravitational field, which in turn, will enable us to better understand its internal structure.

"At just 45 km from the surface, our spacecraft is passing almost within touching distance of Phobos…we’ve been carrying out maneuvers every few months to put the spacecraft on track and, together with the ground stations that will be monitoring it on its close approach, we are ready to make some extremely accurate measurements at Phobos." stated Michael Denis, the Mars Express Operations Manager [source]

As the spacecraft nears Phobos, it will be pulled off course by the moon’s gravity, altering its velocity by a mere few centimeters per second. As these measurements are sent back as radio signals from Mars Express, Earthly scientists will then translate them to determine the mass and and density structure within the moon. This data will assist in addressing questions of origin pertaining to Phobos’ planetary sibling, Deimos, as well.

How does this work? Mars Express possesses a high-resolution stereo camera which has been taking photos of Phobos against the background star field in the previous weeks leading up to this 35 hour tracking sequence: before, during and after the close encounter with Phobos. In addition to researching obtained toward its gravitational field, Mars Express will take measurements on the influence of solar wind on the moon’s surface.

"By making close flybys of Phobos with Mars Express in this way, we can help to put constraints on the origin of these mysterious moons…Mars Express entered orbit around the Red Planet exactly ten years ago this week – this close flyby of Phobos is certainly an exciting way to celebrate!"
- Olivier Witasse, Mars Express Project Scientist at ESA [source]

Phobos’ relative size compared to the Alpes and town of Grenoble, France.

Not so lumpy now, eh?

Excerpts and information from the Phys.org article 'Mars Express heading towards daring flyby of Phobos'. For further details on this marvelous spacecraft, ESA put together a 10-year video montage of Mars Express highlights, providing insight into the sophisticated equipment on board, which you can accompany with the 90-minute replay of ESA’s Mars Express conference from June 2013, which highlights the key scientific discoveries of the mission along with a new mineral atlas created to chart the geological history of Mars.

@3 months ago with 317 notes
#Phobos #mars #carl sagan #astronomy #solar system 

NGC 6946 The Fireworks Galaxy NGC 6946 is a medium-sized, face-on spiral galaxy about 22 million light years away from Earth. In the past century, eight supernovas have been observed to explode in the arms of this galaxy.
Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/MSSL/R.Soria et al, Optical: AURA/Gemini OBs

NGC 6946 The Fireworks Galaxy
NGC 6946 is a medium-sized, face-on spiral galaxy about 22 million light years away from Earth. In the past century, eight supernovas have been observed to explode in the arms of this galaxy.

Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/MSSL/R.Soria et al, Optical: AURA/Gemini OBs

(Source: thedemon-hauntedworld, via galaxyclusters)

@3 months ago with 2627 notes
#galaxies #supernova #astronomy #fireworks #fireworks galaxy 

Comet Lovejoy approaching the Sun, imaged on December 13th, 2013 by Gerald Rhemann.

(via galaxyclusters)

@3 months ago with 25177 notes
#comet #astronomy #astrophotography 

sagansense:

An animation of the hexagonal storm present on Saturn’s north pole.  The hexagon is 30,000 kilometers across and has constant winds of more than 300 kilometers per hour.  Images acquired by the Cassini spacecraft on December 10th, 2012.

via infinity-imagined

(Source: photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov)

@3 months ago with 13555 notes
#Saturn #gif #astronomy #astrophysics 
accuweather:

Amazing Leonid Meteor Shower Photos Captured By Stargazers

The Leonid meteor shower peaked early Saturday (Nov. 17), and some night sky watchers caught a great view.

accuweather:

Amazing Leonid Meteor Shower Photos Captured By Stargazers

The Leonid meteor shower peaked early Saturday (Nov. 17), and some night sky watchers caught a great view.

(via didyoueatallthisacid)

@4 months ago with 5117 notes
#leonids #meteors #meteor shower #astronomy 

thenewenlightenmentage:

Best of 2013!

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

(via joesaidon)

@3 months ago with 4386 notes
#science #astronomy #dark matter #black holes #galaxies #news #2013 #stars #higgs boson #milky way #solar system 
@3 months ago with 1445 notes
#moon #earth #humans #astronomy #art 
sagansense:

For all of you photographers out there - professional or amateur - here’s a wonderfully informative article via the-science-llama on the how-to’s and what-not’s of photographing meteor showers. And for all who are interested, you’ll want to gear up, because 2014 will be quite a cosmically eventful year, filled with many sights to see and falling debris to capture…behind a camera lens, that is.

sagansense:

For all of you photographers out there - professional or amateur - here’s a wonderfully informative article via the-science-llama on the how-to’s and what-not’s of photographing meteor showers. And for all who are interested, you’ll want to gear up, because 2014 will be quite a cosmically eventful year, filled with many sights to see and falling debris to capture…behind a camera lens, that is.

@3 months ago with 36 notes
#photography #astrophotography #science #info #meteors #meteor showers #astronomy 
the-science-llama:

Geminids — December 13/14, 2013A little late with editing the pics I got but here they are. Didn’t really capture that many, mostly because the Moon was out for most of the night. I feel like I would’ve captured more if I faced to the west after the moon set, even in that shorter time period between moon-set and sunrise. My camera fell over in some crazy wind (still fine, magically), so I left about 40 mins early because I was freezing to death already. See the full pic on flickr

the-science-llama:

Geminids — December 13/14, 2013
A little late with editing the pics I got but here they are. Didn’t really capture that many, mostly because the Moon was out for most of the night. I feel like I would’ve captured more if I faced to the west after the moon set, even in that shorter time period between moon-set and sunrise. My camera fell over in some crazy wind (still fine, magically), so I left about 40 mins early because I was freezing to death already. See the full pic on flickr

@3 months ago with 191 notes
#meteor #meteor shower #science #astronomy #photography 

(Source: darkenergies, via galaxyclusters)

@3 months ago with 46530 notes
#astronomy #galaxies #astrophotography 

sagansense:

The color of the Aurora depends on the altitude and the atom being struck by solar radiation (causing excitation). At higher altitudes, there is more Atomic Oxygen than Nitrogen, leading to the common color stratifications you see.

500-200 km altitude
— Atomic Oxygen — Red
200-100 km
— Atomic Oxygen — Greenish-Yellow
— Ionized Nitrogen — Blue/Purple
100-80 km
— Nitrogen (N2) — Crimson

Oxygen only emits red at higher altitudes because once it’s excited, it takes a longer time to emit red than it does green. Why is that important? Well, at lower altitudes there is more Nitrogen for the Oxygen to bump into and absorb that excitation-energy before it gets a chance to emit red light. In this case, where the collision occurs, the Oxygen will emit Green and at low enough altitudes the Nitrogen-Oxygen collisions eventually prevent Oxygen from emitting any light at all.

During stronger storms, high energy solar particles will reach lower in the atmosphere and cause the Crimson emission from Nitrogen, creating a deep-red band at the lower edge of the aurora. Other elements emit light too, like Hydrogen (Blue) or Helium (Purple) which are at higher altitudes.

Sources and further reading:
WebExhibits
ExploratoriumWindow2UniverseWikiGif source

via the-science-llama

@3 months ago with 14710 notes
#science #aurora #astronomy #astrophysics 

The Orion Nebula: What We Have Learned So Far

This week, The Space Telescope Science Institute is hosting a workshop dedicated to the Orion Nebula. Talks and smaller presentations will discuss everything the wealth of ground-based and Hubble observations have taught us about this famous landmark in the sky.

+Scott Lewis and +Tony Darnell will host members of the workshop to talk about (among other things):

* What kind of stars are being born?
* What can infrared observations tell us about Orion?
* Ages and age spreads in the Orion Nebula
* What does the nebula tell us about star formation?
* What can the stars being born in Orion tell us about young star clusters in the galactic center?

Interested in the kind of cutting-edge research that pushes the boundaries of our knowledge of this famous star-forming region? Mark your calendars and bring your questions and comments.

We know you’ll learn something new and we are looking forward to seeing you there!

Duration: 01:01:36

Source: Hubble Site Channel; via skeptv.

(via sagansense)

@4 months ago with 39 notes
#orion #nebula #astronomy #video 


At the fractures of the first second after the big bang.
Fariedesign | Society6 | Facebook 

Source: fariedesign
3 months ago
#big bang #art #illustration #science #astrophysics #astronomy 
3 months ago
#science #astronomy #dark matter #black holes #galaxies #news #2013 #stars #higgs boson #milky way #solar system 
did-you-kno:

Source
3 months ago
#fact #north star #astronomy 
3 months ago
#moon #earth #humans #astronomy #art 
3 months ago
#moon #moon phases #astronomy 
sagansense:

For all of you photographers out there - professional or amateur - here’s a wonderfully informative article via the-science-llama on the how-to’s and what-not’s of photographing meteor showers. And for all who are interested, you’ll want to gear up, because 2014 will be quite a cosmically eventful year, filled with many sights to see and falling debris to capture…behind a camera lens, that is.
3 months ago
#photography #astrophotography #science #info #meteors #meteor showers #astronomy 
sagansense:

Mars’ potato-shaped moon Phobos will be receiving a fly-by of ESA’s Mars Express spacecraft this Sunday! Zipping by 28 feet above its surface, the spacecraft will be traveling too close and too fast for any photo ops, but the science collected from this fly-by will provide the most accurate details yet of the 27 x 22 x 18km moon’s gravitational field, which in turn, will enable us to better understand its internal structure.

"At just 45 km from the surface, our spacecraft is passing almost within touching distance of Phobos…we’ve been carrying out maneuvers every few months to put the spacecraft on track and, together with the ground stations that will be monitoring it on its close approach, we are ready to make some extremely accurate measurements at Phobos." stated Michael Denis, the Mars Express Operations Manager [source]

As the spacecraft nears Phobos, it will be pulled off course by the moon’s gravity, altering its velocity by a mere few centimeters per second. As these measurements are sent back as radio signals from Mars Express, Earthly scientists will then translate them to determine the mass and and density structure within the moon. This data will assist in addressing questions of origin pertaining to Phobos’ planetary sibling, Deimos, as well.

How does this work? Mars Express possesses a high-resolution stereo camera which has been taking photos of Phobos against the background star field in the previous weeks leading up to this 35 hour tracking sequence: before, during and after the close encounter with Phobos. In addition to researching obtained toward its gravitational field, Mars Express will take measurements on the influence of solar wind on the moon’s surface.

"By making close flybys of Phobos with Mars Express in this way, we can help to put constraints on the origin of these mysterious moons…Mars Express entered orbit around the Red Planet exactly ten years ago this week – this close flyby of Phobos is certainly an exciting way to celebrate!"
- Olivier Witasse, Mars Express Project Scientist at ESA [source]

Phobos’ relative size compared to the Alpes and town of Grenoble, France. 

Not so lumpy now, eh?



Excerpts and information from the Phys.org article 'Mars Express heading towards daring flyby of Phobos'. For further details on this marvelous spacecraft, ESA put together a 10-year video montage of Mars Express highlights, providing insight into the sophisticated equipment on board, which you can accompany with the 90-minute replay of ESA’s Mars Express conference from June 2013, which highlights the key scientific discoveries of the mission along with a new mineral atlas created to chart the geological history of Mars.
3 months ago
#Phobos #mars #carl sagan #astronomy #solar system 
the-science-llama:

Geminids — December 13/14, 2013A little late with editing the pics I got but here they are. Didn’t really capture that many, mostly because the Moon was out for most of the night. I feel like I would’ve captured more if I faced to the west after the moon set, even in that shorter time period between moon-set and sunrise. My camera fell over in some crazy wind (still fine, magically), so I left about 40 mins early because I was freezing to death already. See the full pic on flickr
3 months ago
#meteor #meteor shower #science #astronomy #photography 

NGC 6946 The Fireworks Galaxy NGC 6946 is a medium-sized, face-on spiral galaxy about 22 million light years away from Earth. In the past century, eight supernovas have been observed to explode in the arms of this galaxy.
Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/MSSL/R.Soria et al, Optical: AURA/Gemini OBs
3 months ago
#galaxies #supernova #astronomy #fireworks #fireworks galaxy 
3 months ago
#astronomy #galaxies #astrophotography 
3 months ago
#comet #astronomy #astrophotography 
3 months ago
#science #aurora #astronomy #astrophysics 
3 months ago
#Saturn #gif #astronomy #astrophysics 
4 months ago
#orion #nebula #astronomy #video 
accuweather:

Amazing Leonid Meteor Shower Photos Captured By Stargazers

The Leonid meteor shower peaked early Saturday (Nov. 17), and some night sky watchers caught a great view.
4 months ago
#leonids #meteors #meteor shower #astronomy