did-you-kno:

Just to put things in perspective: The Milky Way is so huge, it would take 100,000 years to cross it. If we scaled our solar system down to the size of a quarter, the Sun would be a microscopic speck two soccer fields away from the nearest star. Source

did-you-kno:

Just to put things in perspective: The Milky Way is so huge, it would take 100,000 years to cross it. If we scaled our solar system down to the size of a quarter, the Sun would be a microscopic speck two soccer fields away from the nearest star. Source

@1 hour ago with 1564 notes
#fact #sun #universe #galaxy #astronomy 

zerostatereflex:

Swarm of Tiny Spacecraft to Explore Europa’s Surface with Rapid Response

"A small spacecraft carrying a swarm of "chipsats" the size of postage stamps could someday explore Jupiter’s icy moon, Europa. NASA has funded early development of the unusual mission idea as it looks toward future space exploration of planets and moons that may contain both water and extraterrestrial life."

Imagine seeding the galaxy with something like this? Give us 100 years and the sophistication of such a tiny device could actually delivery life to other galaxies. 

Perhaps that’s what another civilization did, and that’s why we’re here. 

(GIF From: KickSat Sprite deployment / Sprite Spacecraft)

(via galaxyclusters)

@1 week ago with 576 notes
#that's amazing #europa #nasa #space #humans #astronomy #jupiter 
utcjonesobservatory:

Galaxy Of Deception
Astronomers have studied galactic evolution for decades, gradually improving our knowledge of how galaxies have changed over cosmic history. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has played a big part in this, allowing astronomers to see further into the distance, and hence further back in time, than any telescope before it — capturing light that has taken billions of years to reach us.
 Looking further into the very distant past to observe younger and younger galaxies is very valuable, but it is not without its problems for astronomers. All newly-born galaxies lie very far away from us and appear very small and faint in the images. On the contrary, all the galaxies near to us appear to be old ones.
 DDO 68, captured here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, was one of the best candidates so far discovered for a newly-formed galaxy in our cosmic neighbourhood. The galaxy lies around 39 million light-years away from us; although this distance may seem huge, it is in fact roughly 50 times closer than the usual distances to such galaxies, which are on the order of several billions of light years.
 By studying galaxies of various ages, astronomers have found that those early in their lives are fundamentally different from those that are older. DDO 68 looks to be relatively youthful based on its structure, appearance, and composition. However, without more detailed modelling astronomers cannot be sure and they think it may be older than it lets on.
 Elderly galaxies tend to be larger thanks to collisions and mergers with other galaxies that have bulked them out, and are populated with a variety of different types of stars — including old, young, large, and small ones. Their chemical makeup is different too. Newly-formed galaxies have a similar composition to the primordial matter created in the Big Bang (hydrogen, helium and a little lithium), while older galaxies are enriched with heavier elements forged in stellar furnaces over multiple generations of stars.
 DDO 68 is the best representation yet of a primordial galaxy in the local Universe as it appears at first glance to be very low in heavier elements — whose presence would be a sign of the existence of previous generations of stars.
 Hubble observations were carried out in order to study the properties of the galaxy’s light, and to confirm whether or not there are any older stars in DDO 68. If there are, which there seem to be, this would disprove the hypothesis that it is entirely made up of young stars. If not, it would confirm the unique nature of this galaxy. More complex modelling is needed before we can know for sure but Hubble’s picture certainly gives us a beautiful view of this unusual object.
 The image is made up of exposures in visible and infrared light taken with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.
 Caption: NASA/ESA  NASA/ESA

utcjonesobservatory:

Galaxy Of Deception

Astronomers have studied galactic evolution for decades, gradually improving our knowledge of how galaxies have changed over cosmic history. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has played a big part in this, allowing astronomers to see further into the distance, and hence further back in time, than any telescope before it — capturing light that has taken billions of years to reach us.

 Looking further into the very distant past to observe younger and younger galaxies is very valuable, but it is not without its problems for astronomers. All newly-born galaxies lie very far away from us and appear very small and faint in the images. On the contrary, all the galaxies near to us appear to be old ones.

 DDO 68, captured here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, was one of the best candidates so far discovered for a newly-formed galaxy in our cosmic neighbourhood. The galaxy lies around 39 million light-years away from us; although this distance may seem huge, it is in fact roughly 50 times closer than the usual distances to such galaxies, which are on the order of several billions of light years.

 By studying galaxies of various ages, astronomers have found that those early in their lives are fundamentally different from those that are older. DDO 68 looks to be relatively youthful based on its structure, appearance, and composition. However, without more detailed modelling astronomers cannot be sure and they think it may be older than it lets on.

 Elderly galaxies tend to be larger thanks to collisions and mergers with other galaxies that have bulked them out, and are populated with a variety of different types of stars — including old, young, large, and small ones. Their chemical makeup is different too. Newly-formed galaxies have a similar composition to the primordial matter created in the Big Bang (hydrogen, helium and a little lithium), while older galaxies are enriched with heavier elements forged in stellar furnaces over multiple generations of stars.

 DDO 68 is the best representation yet of a primordial galaxy in the local Universe as it appears at first glance to be very low in heavier elements — whose presence would be a sign of the existence of previous generations of stars.

 Hubble observations were carried out in order to study the properties of the galaxy’s light, and to confirm whether or not there are any older stars in DDO 68. If there are, which there seem to be, this would disprove the hypothesis that it is entirely made up of young stars. If not, it would confirm the unique nature of this galaxy. More complex modelling is needed before we can know for sure but Hubble’s picture certainly gives us a beautiful view of this unusual object.

 The image is made up of exposures in visible and infrared light taken with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.

 Caption: NASA/ESA
  NASA/ESA

(via galaxyclusters)

@2 weeks ago with 133 notes
#astronomy #galaxies #astrophysics #nasa #esa 

(Source: smugky, via galaxyclusters)

@1 month ago with 20830 notes
#gif #astronomy #milky way 
thenewenlightenmentage:

IC 4603: Reflection Nebula in Ophiuchius 
Image Credit & Copyright: Rolf Olsen
Explanation: Why does this starfield photograph resemble an impressionistic painting? The effect is created not by digital trickery but by large amounts of interstellar dust. Dust, minute globs rich in carbon and similar in size to cigarette smoke, frequently starts in the outer atmospheres of large, cool, evolved stars. The dust is dispersed as the star dies and grows as things stick to it in the interstellar medium. Dense dust clouds are opaque to visible light and can completely hide background stars. For less dense clouds, the capacity of dust to preferentially reflect blue starlight becomes important, effectively blooming the stars blue light out and marking the surrounding dust. Nebular gas emissions, typically brightest in red light, can combine to form areas seemingly created on an artist’s canvas. Photographed above is the central part of the nebula IC 4603 surrounding the bright star SAO 184376 (actually 8th magnitude) which mostly illuminates the blue reflection nebula. IC 4603 can be seen near the very bright star Antares (1st magnitude) toward the constellation of Ophiuchus.

thenewenlightenmentage:

IC 4603: Reflection Nebula in Ophiuchius 

Image Credit & CopyrightRolf Olsen

Explanation: Why does this starfield photograph resemble an impressionistic painting? The effect is created not by digital trickery but by large amounts of interstellar dust. Dust, minute globs rich in carbon and similar in size to cigarette smoke, frequently starts in the outer atmospheres of large, cool, evolved stars. The dust is dispersed as the star dies and grows as things stick to it in the interstellar medium. Dense dust clouds are opaque to visible light and can completely hide background stars. For less dense clouds, the capacity of dust to preferentially reflect blue starlight becomes important, effectively blooming the stars blue light out and marking the surrounding dust. Nebular gas emissions, typically brightest in red light, can combine to form areas seemingly created on an artist’s canvas. Photographed above is the central part of the nebula IC 4603 surrounding the bright star SAO 184376 (actually 8th magnitude) which mostly illuminates the blue reflection nebulaIC 4603 can be seen near the very bright star Antares (1st magnitude) toward the constellation of Ophiuchus.

(via galaxyclusters)

@2 months ago with 161 notes
#nebula #astronomy #space 
itscolossal:

A Multi-Camera 360° Panoramic Timelapse of the Stars by Vincent Brady [VIDEO]
@4 months ago with 160947 notes
#space #gif #stars #earth #universe #astronomy 

spaceplasma:

Mysterious disk of blue stars around M31’s black hole

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have identified the source of a mysterious blue light surrounding a supermassive black hole in our neighbouring Andromeda Galaxy (M31).

The blue light is coming from a disk of hot, young stars. These stars are whipping around the black hole in much the same way as planets in our solar system are revolving around the Sun. Astronomers are perplexed about how the pancake-shaped disk of stars could form so close to a giant black hole. In such a hostile environment, the black hole’s tidal forces should tear matter apart, making it difficult for gas and dust to collapse and form stars.

Credit: NASA, ESA and G. Bacon (STScI)

(via galaxyclusters)

@4 months ago with 1106 notes
#m31 #andromeda #space #science #astronomy 

"Space is big. Really big. You just won’t believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is.”

-Douglas Adams

(Source: ktt, via ashessgaiill-deactivated2014080)

@4 months ago with 316612 notes
#space #quote #astronomy #nebula 

child-of-thecosmos:

The Very Large Telescope (VLT) is a telescope operated by the European Southern Observatory on Cerro Paranal in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. The VLT consists of four individual telescopes, each with a primary mirror 8.2 m across, which are generally used separately but can be used together to achieve very high angular resolution. The four separate optical telescopes are known as Antu, Kueyen, Melipal and Yepun, which are all words for astronomical objects in the Mapuche language. The telescopes form an array which is complemented by four movable Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) of 1.8 m aperture. (Wikipedia)

Have you ever wondered what’s it like to be inside these telescopes? DeepSkyVideos on YouTube gives us very informative video walkthroughs for all four telescopes: UT-4UT-3UT-1, and UT-2.

(Image and footage credits: ESO VLT Page, SpaceRip)

(via galaxyclusters)

@1 hour ago with 539 notes
#vlt #space #telescope #astronomy 
generalelectric:

Throwback to the time Voyager 1 reached interstellar space and became the farthest human-made object from Earth. What NASA engineers expected to last for five years has lasted for over 37. And it still continues today, barreling through uncharted territories and carrying a piece of all of us to whatever it may encounter. Happy World Space Week! 

generalelectric:

Throwback to the time Voyager 1 reached interstellar space and became the farthest human-made object from Earth. What NASA engineers expected to last for five years has lasted for over 37. And it still continues today, barreling through uncharted territories and carrying a piece of all of us to whatever it may encounter. Happy World Space Week! 

(Source: txchnologist, via galaxyclusters)

@1 week ago with 760 notes
#voyager #nasa #astrophysics #astronomy 

commovente:

The Moon sets behind the temple of Poseidon at Sounio 

(via galaxyclusters)

@1 month ago with 93522 notes
#moon #astronomy #photography 
distant-traveller:


Crescent Mimas







A thin sliver of Mimas is illuminated, the long shadows showing off its many craters, indicators of the moon’s violent history.
The most famous evidence of a collision on Mimas (246 miles, or 396 kilometers across) is the crater Herschel that gives Mimas its Death Star-like appearance.
This view looks toward the anti-Saturn hemisphere of Mimas. North on Mimas is up and rotated 40 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on May 20, 2013.
The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 100,000 miles (200,000 kilometers) from Mimas and at a Sun-Mimas-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 130 degrees. Image scale is 4,000 feet (1 kilometer) per pixel.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

distant-traveller:

Crescent Mimas

A thin sliver of Mimas is illuminated, the long shadows showing off its many craters, indicators of the moon’s violent history.

The most famous evidence of a collision on Mimas (246 miles, or 396 kilometers across) is the crater Herschel that gives Mimas its Death Star-like appearance.

This view looks toward the anti-Saturn hemisphere of Mimas. North on Mimas is up and rotated 40 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on May 20, 2013.

The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 100,000 miles (200,000 kilometers) from Mimas and at a Sun-Mimas-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 130 degrees. Image scale is 4,000 feet (1 kilometer) per pixel.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

(Source: nasa.gov, via galaxyclusters)

@1 month ago with 120 notes
#astronomy #science #moons 

ssv-normandy:

when people casually mention something you’re completely obsessed with and it takes every fuckin ounce of your self control not to propel yourself into the stars and scream for the rest of eternity about how much you love the thing

(via didyoueatallthisacid)

@3 months ago with 674975 notes
#space #Carl Sagan #astronomy #andromeda #science 

(Source: wilwheaton, via galaxyclusters)

@4 months ago with 3224 notes
#science #fact #space #astronomy #news 
@4 months ago with 10908 notes
#galaxy #space #astronomy 
did-you-kno:

Just to put things in perspective: The Milky Way is so huge, it would take 100,000 years to cross it. If we scaled our solar system down to the size of a quarter, the Sun would be a microscopic speck two soccer fields away from the nearest star. Source
1 hour ago
#fact #sun #universe #galaxy #astronomy 
1 hour ago
#vlt #space #telescope #astronomy 
1 week ago
#that's amazing #europa #nasa #space #humans #astronomy #jupiter 
generalelectric:

Throwback to the time Voyager 1 reached interstellar space and became the farthest human-made object from Earth. What NASA engineers expected to last for five years has lasted for over 37. And it still continues today, barreling through uncharted territories and carrying a piece of all of us to whatever it may encounter. Happy World Space Week! 
1 week ago
#voyager #nasa #astrophysics #astronomy 
utcjonesobservatory:

Galaxy Of Deception
Astronomers have studied galactic evolution for decades, gradually improving our knowledge of how galaxies have changed over cosmic history. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has played a big part in this, allowing astronomers to see further into the distance, and hence further back in time, than any telescope before it — capturing light that has taken billions of years to reach us.
 Looking further into the very distant past to observe younger and younger galaxies is very valuable, but it is not without its problems for astronomers. All newly-born galaxies lie very far away from us and appear very small and faint in the images. On the contrary, all the galaxies near to us appear to be old ones.
 DDO 68, captured here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, was one of the best candidates so far discovered for a newly-formed galaxy in our cosmic neighbourhood. The galaxy lies around 39 million light-years away from us; although this distance may seem huge, it is in fact roughly 50 times closer than the usual distances to such galaxies, which are on the order of several billions of light years.
 By studying galaxies of various ages, astronomers have found that those early in their lives are fundamentally different from those that are older. DDO 68 looks to be relatively youthful based on its structure, appearance, and composition. However, without more detailed modelling astronomers cannot be sure and they think it may be older than it lets on.
 Elderly galaxies tend to be larger thanks to collisions and mergers with other galaxies that have bulked them out, and are populated with a variety of different types of stars — including old, young, large, and small ones. Their chemical makeup is different too. Newly-formed galaxies have a similar composition to the primordial matter created in the Big Bang (hydrogen, helium and a little lithium), while older galaxies are enriched with heavier elements forged in stellar furnaces over multiple generations of stars.
 DDO 68 is the best representation yet of a primordial galaxy in the local Universe as it appears at first glance to be very low in heavier elements — whose presence would be a sign of the existence of previous generations of stars.
 Hubble observations were carried out in order to study the properties of the galaxy’s light, and to confirm whether or not there are any older stars in DDO 68. If there are, which there seem to be, this would disprove the hypothesis that it is entirely made up of young stars. If not, it would confirm the unique nature of this galaxy. More complex modelling is needed before we can know for sure but Hubble’s picture certainly gives us a beautiful view of this unusual object.
 The image is made up of exposures in visible and infrared light taken with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.
 Caption: NASA/ESA  NASA/ESA
2 weeks ago
#astronomy #galaxies #astrophysics #nasa #esa 
1 month ago
#moon #astronomy #photography 
1 month ago
#gif #astronomy #milky way 
distant-traveller:


Crescent Mimas







A thin sliver of Mimas is illuminated, the long shadows showing off its many craters, indicators of the moon’s violent history.
The most famous evidence of a collision on Mimas (246 miles, or 396 kilometers across) is the crater Herschel that gives Mimas its Death Star-like appearance.
This view looks toward the anti-Saturn hemisphere of Mimas. North on Mimas is up and rotated 40 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on May 20, 2013.
The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 100,000 miles (200,000 kilometers) from Mimas and at a Sun-Mimas-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 130 degrees. Image scale is 4,000 feet (1 kilometer) per pixel.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute
1 month ago
#astronomy #science #moons 
thenewenlightenmentage:

IC 4603: Reflection Nebula in Ophiuchius 
Image Credit & Copyright: Rolf Olsen
Explanation: Why does this starfield photograph resemble an impressionistic painting? The effect is created not by digital trickery but by large amounts of interstellar dust. Dust, minute globs rich in carbon and similar in size to cigarette smoke, frequently starts in the outer atmospheres of large, cool, evolved stars. The dust is dispersed as the star dies and grows as things stick to it in the interstellar medium. Dense dust clouds are opaque to visible light and can completely hide background stars. For less dense clouds, the capacity of dust to preferentially reflect blue starlight becomes important, effectively blooming the stars blue light out and marking the surrounding dust. Nebular gas emissions, typically brightest in red light, can combine to form areas seemingly created on an artist’s canvas. Photographed above is the central part of the nebula IC 4603 surrounding the bright star SAO 184376 (actually 8th magnitude) which mostly illuminates the blue reflection nebula. IC 4603 can be seen near the very bright star Antares (1st magnitude) toward the constellation of Ophiuchus.
2 months ago
#nebula #astronomy #space 

ssv-normandy:

when people casually mention something you’re completely obsessed with and it takes every fuckin ounce of your self control not to propel yourself into the stars and scream for the rest of eternity about how much you love the thing

(via didyoueatallthisacid)

3 months ago
#space #Carl Sagan #astronomy #andromeda #science 
itscolossal:

A Multi-Camera 360° Panoramic Timelapse of the Stars by Vincent Brady [VIDEO]
4 months ago
#space #gif #stars #earth #universe #astronomy 
4 months ago
#science #fact #space #astronomy #news 
4 months ago
#m31 #andromeda #space #science #astronomy 
4 months ago
#galaxy #space #astronomy 
4 months ago
#space #quote #astronomy #nebula