@1 month ago with 8662 notes
#galaxy #space #astronomy 
pleiadian-starseed:

cosmosontv.com
@4 months ago with 436 notes
#gif #galaxy #space 

thesciencellama:

Galactic Geysers - Milky Way

Giant outflows of charged particles and magnetized fountains of gamma-ray-emitting gas have been detected in the center of our Milky Way galaxy and were mapped out with the CSIRO 64-m Parkes radio telescope.

These ‘geysers’ extend 50,000 light years from end-to-end (the size of the Milky Way is about double that - 100,000 light years across). Something like this requires enormous energy, something along the lines of a million times more energy than a supernova. It was recently found that this energy outflow is fueled by the high density of star forming regions in the galactic center and the eventual death of these stars. These massive structures are similar to the previously detected Fermi Bubbles which are giant bubbles of gamma-rays being spewed from the galactic center of the Milky Way. In this case, however, the magnetic fields were measured by looking at the polarization of the radio emissions from the outflows. The findings about these galactic geysers and their high degree of structure helps us understand how the Galaxy’s overall magnetic field is generated and maintained.

(via sagansense)

@1 year ago with 215 notes
#milky way #galaxy #cosmology #astronomy #astrophysics #science #fermi #quantum mechanics 
ikenbot:

Ancient Galaxy May Be Most Distant Ever Seen


  Astronomers have spotted seven galaxies that existed just a few hundred million years after the universe’s birth, including one that may be the oldest found to date.
  
  This new image of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) 2012 campaign reveals a previously unseen population of seven faraway galaxies, which are observed as they appeared in a period 350 million to 600 million years after the big bang. Credit: NASA, ESA, R. Ellis (Caltech), and the UDF 2012 Team
  
  The potential record-holding galaxy, known as UDFj-39546284, likely existed when the universe was just 380 million years old, researchers said, and may be the farthest galaxy ever seen. The other six distant galaxies all formed within 600 million years of the Big Bang, which created our universe 13.7 billion years ago.
  
  UDFj-39546284 was detected previously, and researchers had thought it formed just 500 million years or so after the Big Bang. The new observations, made using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, push its probable formation time back even further.
  
  The seven galaxies constitute the first reliable census of the epoch from 400 million to 600 million years after the universe’s birth, researchers said. This census detects a steady increase in galaxies over this period, suggesting that the formation of the first stars and galaxies — the so-called “cosmic dawn” — happened gradually rather than suddenly.
  
  “The cosmic dawn was probably not a single, dramatic event,” study lead author Richard Ellis, of Caltech in Pasadena, told reporters today (Dec. 12).
  
  Ellis and his team pointed Hubble at a small patch of sky known as the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, which the telescope observed for many hours to build up enough light to spot extremely faint, distant objects. The researchers used Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 to study the deep field in near-infrared wavelengths during August and September 2012.
  
  The astronomers used special filters to measure the galaxies’ redshifts — how much their light has been stretched by the expansion of space. From the redshifts, the researchers were able to calculate the distance to each galaxy, revealing their ages.
  
  The results “represent our cosmic roots,” said Harvard astronomer Abraham Loeb, who was not involved in the study. The new Hubble data “comes from the biggest archaeological dig that we have of the universe.”

ikenbot:

Ancient Galaxy May Be Most Distant Ever Seen

Astronomers have spotted seven galaxies that existed just a few hundred million years after the universe’s birth, including one that may be the oldest found to date.

This new image of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) 2012 campaign reveals a previously unseen population of seven faraway galaxies, which are observed as they appeared in a period 350 million to 600 million years after the big bang. Credit: NASA, ESA, R. Ellis (Caltech), and the UDF 2012 Team

The potential record-holding galaxy, known as UDFj-39546284, likely existed when the universe was just 380 million years old, researchers said, and may be the farthest galaxy ever seen. The other six distant galaxies all formed within 600 million years of the Big Bang, which created our universe 13.7 billion years ago.

UDFj-39546284 was detected previously, and researchers had thought it formed just 500 million years or so after the Big Bang. The new observations, made using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, push its probable formation time back even further.

The seven galaxies constitute the first reliable census of the epoch from 400 million to 600 million years after the universe’s birth, researchers said. This census detects a steady increase in galaxies over this period, suggesting that the formation of the first stars and galaxies — the so-called “cosmic dawn” — happened gradually rather than suddenly.

“The cosmic dawn was probably not a single, dramatic event,” study lead author Richard Ellis, of Caltech in Pasadena, told reporters today (Dec. 12).

Ellis and his team pointed Hubble at a small patch of sky known as the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, which the telescope observed for many hours to build up enough light to spot extremely faint, distant objects. The researchers used Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 to study the deep field in near-infrared wavelengths during August and September 2012.

The astronomers used special filters to measure the galaxies’ redshifts — how much their light has been stretched by the expansion of space. From the redshifts, the researchers were able to calculate the distance to each galaxy, revealing their ages.

The results “represent our cosmic roots,” said Harvard astronomer Abraham Loeb, who was not involved in the study. The new Hubble data “comes from the biggest archaeological dig that we have of the universe.”

(Source: afro-dominicano)

@1 year ago with 314 notes
#science #space #news #education #history #astronomy #astrophysics #redshift #galaxies #galaxy #cosmos #cosmology #Hubble #NASA #universe 
we-are-star-stuff:

Spiral galaxy NGC 3521 is olny 35 million light-years from Earth, toward the constellation Leo. Spanning some 50,000 light-years, the galaxy sports characteristic patchy, irregular spiral armslaced with dust, pink star forming regions, and clusters of young, blue stars. This deep image shows NGC 3521 embedded in gigantic bubble-like shells. The shells are likely tidal debris, streams of stars torn from satellite galaxies that have undergone mergers with NGC 3521 in the distant past.

we-are-star-stuff:

Spiral galaxy NGC 3521 is olny 35 million light-years from Earth, toward the constellation Leo. Spanning some 50,000 light-years, the galaxy sports characteristic patchy, irregular spiral armslaced with dust, pink star forming regions, and clusters of young, blue stars. This deep image shows NGC 3521 embedded in gigantic bubble-like shells. The shells are likely tidal debris, streams of stars torn from satellite galaxies that have undergone mergers with NGC 3521 in the distant past.

(via sagansense)

@1 year ago with 60 notes
#science #astronomy #astrophysics #galaxy 
@1 year ago with 123893 notes
#galaxy #m31 #andromeda #astronomy #science 
the-star-stuff:

Milky Way Galaxy is dwarfed by its massive hot gas “halo”
The image shows the hot gas extending with a radius of 300,000 light years — but NASA says it may “extend significantly further.”
You can read the entire paper, published in the Sept. 1 issue of The Astrophysical Journal, here.

the-star-stuff:

Milky Way Galaxy is dwarfed by its massive hot gas “halo”

The image shows the hot gas extending with a radius of 300,000 light years — but NASA says it may “extend significantly further.”

You can read the entire paper, published in the Sept. 1 issue of The Astrophysical Journal, here.

@1 year ago with 82 notes
#science #educ #astronomy #milky way #galaxy #halo 

the-star-stuff:

The Breathtaking Space Pictures

1. Josh Lake | Star-forming region NGC 1763

2. Andre van der Hoeven | Spiral Galaxy Messier 77

3. Judy Schmidt | Star XZ Tauri

4. Renaud Houdinet | Nebula Chamaeleon I

5. Robert Gendler | Spiral Galaxy Messier 96


@1 year ago with 199 notes
#science #space #astronomy #universe #cosmos #galaxy #nebula #stars 

(Source: afterthesmoke, via damnnskimpy)

@1 month ago with 125142 notes
#Space #astronomy #galaxy #universe 

(Source: spacethegalaxy, via loveyourchaos)

@1 year ago with 11685 notes
#galaxy #astronomy 

  NGC2403
  
  “Spiral galaxy NGC2403 imaged earlier this week. Data combined from two telescopes: Luminance and H-Alpha from Hyperion 12.5” f/8 and RGB data from a HyperStar-equipped C11 at f/2. Total combined exposure time from the two scopes is 17.5 hours—all taken on one night!” — Scott Tucker & Gil Esquerdo

NGC2403

“Spiral galaxy NGC2403 imaged earlier this week. Data combined from two telescopes: Luminance and H-Alpha from Hyperion 12.5” f/8 and RGB data from a HyperStar-equipped C11 at f/2. Total combined exposure time from the two scopes is 17.5 hours—all taken on one night!” — Scott Tucker & Gil Esquerdo

(Source: afro-dominicano, via scinerds)

@1 year ago with 125 notes
#science #space #astrophotography #astronomy #galaxies #galaxy #universe 

the-star-stuff:

100,000 Stars: An Interactive Exploration of the Milky Way Galaxy

100,000 Stars is a new experiment for Chrome web browsers (or any other WebGL browser like Firefox or Safari) that lets you interactively explore the Milky Way galaxy with your mouse and scroll wheel. 

@1 year ago with 277 notes
#science #space #astronomy #100 000 stars #milky way #galaxy #news #education #educ #chrome #firefox #safari 
@1 year ago with 8219 notes
#gif #galaxy #galaxies 
iliveinaspiralgalaxy:

M31 - Andromeda Galxy - 10-4-12 by Shadow2097 on Flickr.
@1 year ago with 45 notes
#M31 #Andromeda #Galaxy #space #astronomy #flickr 

staceythinx:

Illustrations by Moonrunner

About Moonrunner:

Moonrunner is primarily known for its science-based illustrations, especially in such fields as astro-physics, cosmology, dark energy, black holes, the solar system and such stellar phenomena as quasars, star nurseries and pulsars. We have worked with Stephen Hawking, as well as with the scientist/authors of the National Geographic and Scientific American magazines, and also those publishing with Dorling Kindersley, Weidenfeld & Nicolson and Weldon Owen.

Click on the images to see what they represent.

@1 year ago with 911 notes
#art #illustration #science #universe #cosmology #cosmos #astro #Astronomy #stars #multiverse #quarks #higgs boson #LHC #galaxy #solar system #galaxies #milky way #dark matter #black hole 
1 month ago
#galaxy #space #astronomy 
1 month ago
#Space #astronomy #galaxy #universe 
pleiadian-starseed:

cosmosontv.com
4 months ago
#gif #galaxy #space 
1 year ago
#galaxy #astronomy 
1 year ago
#milky way #galaxy #cosmology #astronomy #astrophysics #science #fermi #quantum mechanics 

  NGC2403
  
  “Spiral galaxy NGC2403 imaged earlier this week. Data combined from two telescopes: Luminance and H-Alpha from Hyperion 12.5” f/8 and RGB data from a HyperStar-equipped C11 at f/2. Total combined exposure time from the two scopes is 17.5 hours—all taken on one night!” — Scott Tucker & Gil Esquerdo
1 year ago
#science #space #astrophotography #astronomy #galaxies #galaxy #universe 
ikenbot:

Ancient Galaxy May Be Most Distant Ever Seen


  Astronomers have spotted seven galaxies that existed just a few hundred million years after the universe’s birth, including one that may be the oldest found to date.
  
  This new image of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) 2012 campaign reveals a previously unseen population of seven faraway galaxies, which are observed as they appeared in a period 350 million to 600 million years after the big bang. Credit: NASA, ESA, R. Ellis (Caltech), and the UDF 2012 Team
  
  The potential record-holding galaxy, known as UDFj-39546284, likely existed when the universe was just 380 million years old, researchers said, and may be the farthest galaxy ever seen. The other six distant galaxies all formed within 600 million years of the Big Bang, which created our universe 13.7 billion years ago.
  
  UDFj-39546284 was detected previously, and researchers had thought it formed just 500 million years or so after the Big Bang. The new observations, made using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, push its probable formation time back even further.
  
  The seven galaxies constitute the first reliable census of the epoch from 400 million to 600 million years after the universe’s birth, researchers said. This census detects a steady increase in galaxies over this period, suggesting that the formation of the first stars and galaxies — the so-called “cosmic dawn” — happened gradually rather than suddenly.
  
  “The cosmic dawn was probably not a single, dramatic event,” study lead author Richard Ellis, of Caltech in Pasadena, told reporters today (Dec. 12).
  
  Ellis and his team pointed Hubble at a small patch of sky known as the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, which the telescope observed for many hours to build up enough light to spot extremely faint, distant objects. The researchers used Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 to study the deep field in near-infrared wavelengths during August and September 2012.
  
  The astronomers used special filters to measure the galaxies’ redshifts — how much their light has been stretched by the expansion of space. From the redshifts, the researchers were able to calculate the distance to each galaxy, revealing their ages.
  
  The results “represent our cosmic roots,” said Harvard astronomer Abraham Loeb, who was not involved in the study. The new Hubble data “comes from the biggest archaeological dig that we have of the universe.”
1 year ago
#science #space #news #education #history #astronomy #astrophysics #redshift #galaxies #galaxy #cosmos #cosmology #Hubble #NASA #universe 
1 year ago
#science #space #astronomy #100 000 stars #milky way #galaxy #news #education #educ #chrome #firefox #safari 
we-are-star-stuff:

Spiral galaxy NGC 3521 is olny 35 million light-years from Earth, toward the constellation Leo. Spanning some 50,000 light-years, the galaxy sports characteristic patchy, irregular spiral armslaced with dust, pink star forming regions, and clusters of young, blue stars. This deep image shows NGC 3521 embedded in gigantic bubble-like shells. The shells are likely tidal debris, streams of stars torn from satellite galaxies that have undergone mergers with NGC 3521 in the distant past.
1 year ago
#science #astronomy #astrophysics #galaxy 
1 year ago
#gif #galaxy #galaxies 
1 year ago
#galaxy #m31 #andromeda #astronomy #science 
iliveinaspiralgalaxy:

M31 - Andromeda Galxy - 10-4-12 by Shadow2097 on Flickr.
1 year ago
#M31 #Andromeda #Galaxy #space #astronomy #flickr 
the-star-stuff:

Milky Way Galaxy is dwarfed by its massive hot gas “halo”
The image shows the hot gas extending with a radius of 300,000 light years — but NASA says it may “extend significantly further.”
You can read the entire paper, published in the Sept. 1 issue of The Astrophysical Journal, here.
1 year ago
#science #educ #astronomy #milky way #galaxy #halo 
1 year ago
#art #illustration #science #universe #cosmology #cosmos #astro #Astronomy #stars #multiverse #quarks #higgs boson #LHC #galaxy #solar system #galaxies #milky way #dark matter #black hole 
1 year ago
#science #space #astronomy #universe #cosmos #galaxy #nebula #stars